Toyota shows stylish new C-HR crossover

Toyota unveiled their latest SUV at Geneva 2016
GENEVA -- Sales of bite-sized cross-overs are soaring, and Toyota finally is getting into the game, introducing the production C-HR last week at the Geneva auto show. The Toyota C-HR crossover is likely to go on sale in the U.S. next year.

The funky little crossover is essentially Toyota’s take on the Nissan Juke. In both funkiness and flavor, the C-HR is a mess of lines, creases, and edges that coalesce into Toyota’s newest crossover. Tendrils of Scion’s styling has crept into the C-HR, with a nose that appears closely related to the Scion iM and funky details like the striking wheels and black roof.

Toyota unveiled their latest SUV at Geneva 2016

Toyota unveiled their latest SUV at Geneva 2016

Underneath all the busy styling resides Toyota’s tried-and-true New Global Architecture platform that also underpins the 2016 Prius. At launch, the first available powertrain will be a variant of the 1.8-liter hybrid system found in the Prius, pushing out a leisurely 120 hp. The C-HR will eventually be offered with a naturally aspirated powerplant following the hybrid. Europe will get a turbocharged 1.2-liter four-banger, while the U.S. will most likely get a 2.0-liter naturally aspirated four-cylinder. Power for the naturally-aspirated engine will be sent to either the front and/or all four wheels likely through a CVT transmission.


Toyota unveiled their latest SUV at Geneva 2016

Toyota unveiled their latest SUV at Geneva 2016

Toyota unveiled their latest SUV at Geneva 2016

Toyota unveiled their latest SUV at Geneva 2016

What took so long? Blame the Toyota New Global Architecture modular platform.

When Toyota started working on the C-HR six years ago, the automaker planned to put it on a small-car platform, Hiroyuki Koba, chief engineer on the C-HR, said.

But midway through the crossover's development, Toyota shifted to the upcoming TNGA. "We were studying which [platform] was best and after looking at TNGA we said, "This is best,'" Koba said.

The C-HR is the second Toyota -- behind the new Prius -- to use the TNGA platform. Its use allows the automaker to package three different powertrains into the C-HR. The TNGA also reduces production cost and complexity by sharing components with its platform mates, the Prius and next-generation Corolla, expected in 2019.






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